THERE'S ALWAYS MONEY IN THE BANANA STAND!

Jul 22
freddieboychilton:

freddieboychilton:

sometimes people on facebook annoy me
"oH my GEORGe"
"Jeffrey Damnit!"
"WHERE THE STEPHANIE IS MY SOCK"

"WHAT THE ESTEBAN JULIO RICARDO MONTOYA DE LA ROSA RAMIREZ IS WRONG WITH HER”

freddieboychilton:

freddieboychilton:

sometimes people on facebook annoy me

"oH my GEORGe"

"Jeffrey Damnit!"

"WHERE THE STEPHANIE IS MY SOCK"

"WHAT THE ESTEBAN JULIO RICARDO MONTOYA DE LA ROSA RAMIREZ IS WRONG WITH HER”

Jul 22
noablaespanol:

dennys:

We got our hands on the leaked script for Episode VII and boy is it nuts! And really short? We’re just glad to be a part of it.


WHAT IN THE ACTUAL FUCK

noablaespanol:

dennys:

We got our hands on the leaked script for Episode VII and boy is it nuts! And really short? We’re just glad to be a part of it.

WHAT IN THE ACTUAL FUCK
Jul 22

jesliey:

homosaurus-rex:

homosaurus-rex:

It’s actually a good thing that the zombie apocalypse starts in Florida because then the zombies only have one way to go and that’s straight up into trigger happy redneck territory. I give it two weeks before monster trucks and mullets save us.

can we talk about how this is still getting notes

The funny thing is that i can not actually come up with a counter argument for this.

Jul 21

diary-of-a-stormtrooper:

The Ferb is strong with Phineas…

July 26th at 9pm on the Disney channel. =]

http://disneychannel.disney.com/phineas-and-ferb/star-wars

|-o-|

Watch it early on the Watch Disney Channel app

Jul 21
Phineas and Ferb Star Wars special just covering their asses not to upset the fandom! BTW this special was amazing!

Phineas and Ferb Star Wars special just covering their asses not to upset the fandom! BTW this special was amazing!

Jul 21
Thank you Phineas and Ferb for knowing correctly who shot first.

Thank you Phineas and Ferb for knowing correctly who shot first.

Jul 20

holysheerios:

holysheerios:

teddysfotos:

i just

I’m so sorry

PLEASE STOP REBLOGGING THIS I DONT REALLY KNOW WHAT A MANGO IS BUT IT SEEMED LIKE A GOOD IDEA AT THE TIME

Jul 20
jimmypricelabguru:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.


Thank God!I thought I had early onset dementia. Science, my beloved companion, you never fail me.

jimmypricelabguru:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

Thank God!

I thought I had early onset dementia.

Science, my beloved companion, you never fail me.

Jul 20
Jul 18

fightclubbing:

Can I get a ballpit for my 20th birthday? I think I’m gonna do that

You’ll only get one hour to play in it. When you turn 21 you’ll receive an extra hour.